While the parts are soaking in the Citric Acidclip_image001 Bath, we’ll turn our attention to the knob and tote. This one needs some repair.

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This tote is broke. It’s been broke for a while and is extremely dirty. I use a Dremel toolclip_image001[1] With a Dremel wire wheelclip_image001[2] To clean it up. Take care to stay away from the edged so you don’t round them over, making the repair much more visible.

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Next I drill a series of shallow holes. This gives the epoxy a better grabbing surface. This is more important on rosewood then beech, beech hold pretty well anyhow, but I like the extra strength.

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Use your favorite epoxy. I use System 3 Quick Cureclip_image001[3]

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Make sure you work it into the holes you’ve drilled.

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Then just clamp it tight until it cures.

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Now we’ll turn our focus on the knob. I have a bucket of special bolts I use for knob sanding. Most have been modified for different size applications. I like the head to sit inside the bolt hole so sanding is complete. Then just chuck it up in a drill. I typically use the drill press, but a hand held drill or the lathe all work well.

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The a couple of coats of tru oilclip_image001[4] Or Rust-Oleum 1906830 Lacquer Spray, Clear, 11-Ounceclip_image001[5] And we’re complete.

I’ll sand the tote and apply the same finish

Note: I keep a small container under this when sanding rosewood to catch the dust for making crack repairs.

Click Here to see more tricks and tips on sanding the tote.

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