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For this Stanley-themed Hand Tool Thursday in support of @stanley_tool_heritage, I present my original condition Stanley Bronze Trammel Points.

Trammel points are used in conjunction with a straight edge by carpenters, cabinetmakers and other woodworkers to scratch or draw circles or arcs of larger radius than could be achieved with dividers or compasses. One point is spotted at the desired center of curvature, and the other slides down the straight edge and is clamped at the desired radius. The bar is then pivoted around the fixed center point, and the relevant curve is marked. These circles and arcs, as well as being useful in and of themselves, also form the basis for geometrical construction of other angles and shapes, making trammel points an indispensable tool for complex layouts. Trammel points were also used by some metalworkers, and Stanley’s No. 5 version was aimed at machinists.

These bronze trammel points were made in three sizes – No. 1, 2 and 3, based on the maximum size of the straight edge upon which they would be clamped. These are No.2, and can accommodate a bar of up to one inch. The body, keeper and set screw are all made from bronze, and the points are made from polished steel. This pair is unusual in two ways… First, they are still accompanied by their original nickel-played steel pencil clasp, which was used to hold a pencil and enable drawing rather than scratching. These have almost always been lost down the years, and so originals are quite rare. We can tell it is an original clasp because it is unmarked – Stanley also sold replacements separately, but the replacements were naked Stanley No. 8.

The second way these are unusual is that they have the ultra-rare type one Sweetheart logo, which was only used for a year in 1920.

 

 

Trammel Points