Part 5 Lets make a knife = Stock Removal Style.

So, remember. I’m on a learning streak. I found I did a little more grinding free hand on this knife, so practice is sure helping. Here is a piece of 1080.

First I marked out the knife I wanted. As I said earlier, I’m still working on a somewhat easy design.
I cut the piece to length. I used my bandsaw, but a
hacksaw or cutoff wheel in a grinder will do fine.
Now I cut the profile on the cutting edge only. You’ll see why shortly.
Next, I hit the edge cut on the grinder to get it consistent. Next time I’ll clean this up better. It makes sharpening easier later on.

Then I coated the edge with layout blue
Using the marking gauge I marked the center line. I discovered the lines should have been closer together. From now on I’ll shoot for a single line dead center.
And into the jig. Leaving the back flat gives me a solid reference for the jig. Not an absolute requirement, but I think it helps.
I grind one side at a time, up close to the line, but leaving a little bit in the center. You don’t want sharp yet.
Then I laid out the backside profile again.
I laid out the holes I wanted. I want them centered and evenly spaced
I use a center punch so I drill doesn’t wonder
And since I’m here, I’ll add my touch mark
Then, using a bit I recently sharpened, I’ll drill the holes
A few added holes to lighten the knife, help the epoxy grab, and even the balance.
Off to the grinder. You’ll want to flatten. I’ve found holding the knife flat on the grinder works best. Working side to side is difficult to get flat.
And a magnet makes a great handle
Ready for heat treat
Then temper.
A little hand work and clean up after the tempering. Then off to adding the handle.

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