Published in the March 1901 Carpentry and Building trade paper. 

 Common Sense Saw Filing Clamp, We show in Fig. 9 of the illustrations the application of the Common Sense saw filing clamp made by W.H.Colyer of Morrison, Ill. The jaws of the clamp are 28 inches long, made of hard maple and beveled at the top edge so that the filer will not come in contact with the jaws. The vertical part of the device revolves upon its support, whatever it may be, thus avoiding the necessity of taking the saw out of the clamp and turning it around, as must be done with other clamps. By means of a thumb nut the support may be instantly made fast or to revolve. The jaws on the underside are reinforced with a strip of band iron, making them perfectly rigid and holding the clamp sides strong, so that the tension will be rigid at both the outer ends. The clamp may be readily adjusted to a saw horse, bench or any other convenient support, allowing the operator to get to the light in a building, or, if necessary, by picking up the clamp, stepping outside into the daylight. The jaws are operated by a thumb nut working on a threaded bolt passing through the support, and are opened and closed instantly. The manufacturer states that there is no part of the clamp that cannot be replaced by a carpenter with very little cost, and that it can be put in any tool chest. The device has been thoroughly tested and filers who have used it refer to the satisfaction which it has given in practical work.