I purchase this saw in a pile of stuff. The goal was to restore it and use it. Here is how I did it.

For Information on Wheeler, Madden & Clemson Back saw

Monhagen Saw Works. Wheeler, Madden & Bakewell, Manufacturers of Warrented Patent Ground, Extra Cast Steel, Circular Saws, Mill, Mulay, Cross-cut, Hand, Panel and Rip Saws, Butcher’s Bow Saws, Back Saws, Wood Saws, Felloe and Turning Webs, and Plastering Trowels. Manufactory, At Middletown, Orange

County, N.Y.. Branch Office and Warehouse, No. 39 Platt Street, New York. 1859. A very early catalog from the company that morphed into Wheeler, Madden & Clemson, Woodrough & McParlin which eventually was abosrbed by the National Saw Company.

http://toolemera.com/Manufacturers%20&%20Merchants/Mfg.%20jklmn/mfg.monhegan.html

This is how it started.

I took it apart and covered it with rust remover. I haven’t been able to find evaporust locally. I’ve tried Tractor supply and home depot, along with a few other spots. Here I used Rustoliem rust remover. It really doesn’t work all that well. Once I use it up I won’t buy it again.

Next was off to the wire wheel. I tried the fine wheel I typically use, but it wasn’t working very well. I switched to the course which worked much better. After the rust was removed I switched back to the fine and did it again.

Once that was cleaned, I sanded using 220, 320, and 500 grit. I tried to not hit the teeth with the wheel or the sand paper.

I then gave it a coat of Fluid Film. (This stuff is great for preventing rust)

Next came the brass nuts. I wire wheeled them using the fine wheel, then buffed.

The emblem took and extra step.

A small fine wire wheel and a light touch did the trick.

Next for the handle. I had not noticed the crack before. It had to be fixed. Using a clamp I spread the crack. It wasn’t cracked all the way through, and I didn’t want to make it worse.

Rubbed some glue and forced it into the crack. Clamped it and set it off to the side. Back to the plane restoration for a while.

Once the glue was dry, I sanded the handles. I started with 120, then 180, 220, 320, 500. The I applied BLO with steel wool.

Put it back together and tested to see how bad it needed sharpening. Believe it or not, its still sharp. Its a user.

Tomorrow it will get another coat of BLO.